New Cold War (1)Third edition is available for purchase from Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Indiebound.

The revised and updated third edition includes a new preface on the Crimean crisis, including analysis of the dismemberment of Ukraine, and a look at the devastating effects it may have from bloodshed to economic losses.


 

The New Cold War is an impressive polemic arguing that the West still underestimates the danger that Putin’s Russia poses.’ Thomas De Waal, The Sunday Times

Norwegian edition

Norwegian edition

‘If you need a convincing argument for a joined up EU foreign policy, look no further’ Angus MacQueen, Guardian

Read more reviews here.

Russia’s vengeful, xenophobic, and ruthless rulers have turned the sick man of Europe into a menacing bully. The rise to power of Vladimir Putin and his ex-KGB colleagues coincided with a tenfold rise in world oil prices.

 

Previous English edition

Previous English edition

Though its incompetent authoritarian rule is a tragic missed opportunity for the Russian people, Kremlin, Inc. has paid off the state’s crippling debts and is restoring its clout at home and abroad. Inside Russia it has crushed every constraint, muzzling the media, brushing aside political opposition, castrating the courts and closing down critical pressure groups. The murders in 2006 of the journalist Anna Politkovskaya in Russia, and the British citizen Aleksandr Litvinenko, highlight the danger faced by anyone who stands in the Kremlin’s way.

In eastern Europe, vulnerable and ill-run, and even in the complacent rich democracies, Russia is subverting the institutions of state and buying up the commanding heights of the economy.

Estonian edition

Estonian edition

Rights to The New Cold War have been sold in the following countries: Bulgaria (Prozorets), Estonia (Varrak), Germany (Riemann), Holland (Nieuw Amsterdam), Hungary (Gabo Kiado), Latvia (Atena), Lithuania (Baltos Lankos), Poland (Rebis), Norway (Gyldendal), USA (Palgrave-Macmillan).

Italian edition

Italian edition

Reviews for The New Cold War

‘Lucas’s main message comes through loud and clear: Russia has changed course, and the West should face up to the implications. For instance, he asks, what justification is there for keeping Russia’s continued membership in the G8, the club for the world’s leading industrial democracies? Lucas has built a very strong case for the prosecution … the defendant looks smugly guilty.’ Newsweek

The New Cold War is an impressive polemic arguing that the West still underestimates the danger that Putin’s Russia poses.’ Thomas De Waal, The Sunday Times

“The best portrait to date of the mentality of Putin’s ruling class, much of it a product of the KGB, the corrupted crony capitalism it has spawned and the uses, many of them hostile to the West, to which it is putting its fabulous war chest of oil and gas money.” Marcus Warren, The Sunday Telegraph

Lithuanian edition

Lithuanian edition

Bulgarian edition

Bulgarian edition

‘Edward Lucas intends to issue a wake-up call. His book’s urgency is fulled by the belief that, while the Russian bear has been sharpening its claws, the West has slept. Our first mistake, he argues, is ever to have regarded Russia as “normal”. Our second has been to take our eyes off the ball, so obsessed with the “war on terror” that we have failed to understand the implications of Kremlin policy and pronouncements, as personified by Vladimir Putin. Taken together, the elements Lucas identifies as comprising the Kremlin’s menace to Russia provide strong evidence for his case.’ Virginia Rounding, The Independent

‘Highly informed, crisply written and alarming… Wise up and stick together is the concluding message in Lucas’s outstanding book.’ Michael Burleigh, Evening Standard

‘Edward Lucas is the foremost British expert on contemporary Russia. His book is an outstanding piece of research and a testimony to its author’s thorough knowledge and understanding of Russia in general, and its last seventeen years in particular. I doubt if any Russian academic would have been able to write such a work, since both a healthy distance from its subject and a penetrating sideways look are needed.’ The Literary Review.

Russian edition

Russian edition

‘The pages turn easily, but the book’s value for those who already know Russia’s story relatively well starts multiplying when Lucas dives into the subject of “sovereign democracy”, Putin’s euphemism for rent-seeking autocracy with the occasional (heavily manipulated) popular vote, and the means by which the Kremlin seeks to project this evolving post-Soviet ideology beyond Russia’s borders.
Readers whose preference is to morally equivocate between great power politics ala Washington and Brussels and the despairing Russian alternative will find themselves squirming.’ BalkanInsight.com

Latvian edition

Latvian edition

‘Lucas has a vivid, highly readable style’ Bloomberg.com

Advance Praise for The New Cold War

‘Edward Lucas is one of the best-informed, best-connected, and most perceptive journalists writing about Putin’s Russia: His New Cold War is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand what is happening in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union today.’—Anne Applebaum, author of Gulag

German edition

German edition

‘Edward Lucas offers a devastating but apt critique of Vladimir Putin’s domestic repression and increasingly aggressive foreign policy. This stark and clear-sighted book is an excellent read. It makes evident the need for a new Western policy. Russia’s political development is one of the key issues of our time.’—Anders Åslund, senior fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington, D.C.

‘Veteran Moscow news correspondent Edward Lucas provides an authoritative analysis of the disturbing events in Russia today in this thoughtful, thoroughly researched and brilliantly written book that deserves the widest possible readership.’—Robert Gellately, author of Lenin, Stalin and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe

Ukrainian edition

Ukrainian edition

‘Edward Lucas has written a brilliant and profoundly disturbing study of modern Russia.  It is the history of rediscovered authoritarianism and the stunning brutality with which the KGB elite returned to power.  It is also the story of how Western venality and political credulity made this possible and placed the security of Europe at risk.  Above all, this is the tale of how President Putin methodically destroyed the vestiges of democracy in Russia and launched a New Cold War against the West.  It is difficult to overstate the importance of Edward Lucas’s latest work for US and European policymakers.’—Bruce P. Jackson, President, Project on Transitional Democracies

Dutch edition

Dutch edition

‘While the West is preoccupied with the Middle East and Islamic terrorism, Edward Lucas warns, Russia is quietly reinventing herself as a milder version of the Soviet Union and hence as a new threat to the West.  Conceding Putin’s domestic achievements, the seasoned East European correspondent of The Economist tracks post-Communist Russia’s skillful exploitation of the capitalist world’s greed to divide and thus to dominate it. It is a chilling account that needs to be taken seriously.’—Richard Pipes

Polish edition

Polish edition

‘Edward Lucas’s absorbing book shows the forces that are turning Russia against the West. They include militarism, greed and a failure to understand that national greatness can only be based on civilized values. It is an invaluable primer for students of the Russian situation and a cautionary tale for those who prefer to treat Russia as it pretends to be rather than as it is.’—David Satter, author of Darkness at Dawn: the Rise of the Russian Criminal State

‘Since we have failed to achieve a conclusive victory in the first Cold War, we now face the second one looming. The revenge-seeking KGB regime in Russia is doing its best to restore the old Soviet Empire, as aggressive and dangerous as ever. It is high time for the West to analyse the facts, raise alarm and work out a counter-strategy. So Edward Lucas’s perceptive, informative and accurate account of the Kremlin threat is highly relevant.’—Vladimir Bukovsky, former Soviet dissident and Russian presidential candidate